Minnesota Hospital Association

MHA AWARDS

The Minnesota Hospital Association Annual Health Care Awards honor the best and brightest in Minnesota health care — individuals who have offered dedicated service to hospitals and organizations that have implemented successful, innovative programs.

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MHA Associate Member of the Year Award

Life Link III, Minneapolis

2017

Life Link III image Life Link III's helicopter and airplane services provide on-scene emergency response and inter-facility transport for patients requiring critical care. Link Link III has been a strong supporter of MHA in a variety of areas, including promoting and delivering on the goals of the Triple Aim. This associate member provides financial and information support for our events and programs and always says "yes" when asked for help.

MHA Best Minnesota Hospital Workplace Award

River's Edge Hospital & Clinic, Saint Peter

2017

Rivers Edge image In recent years, leaders at River's Edge Hospital & Clinic have implemented a series of best practices to improve employee turnover, morale and, ultimately, patient satisfaction. These processes, along with monthly employee rounding, thank-you notes and employee engagement surveys, have helped River's Edge develop a culture of camaraderie and teamwork. After seeing significant improvement overall, the hospital identified departments that needed additional coaching on retaining employees. An employee retention committee was formed, made up of the chief human resource officer and managers who were still experiencing high turnover in their departments. Since starting the retention committee and implementing the new practices, two departments have stood out in decreasing turnover rates. In the lab, turnover was at 45 percent in 2015. It dropped to 12 percent in 2016 and is currently at 0 percent for 2017. The registration department experienced a 50 percent turnover rate in 2015. That improved to 10 percent in 2016 and is currently at 0 percent in 2017.

MHA Best Minnesota Hospital Workplace Award

Regions Hospital, Saint Paul

2017

Regions Hospital image To meet employees' physical health needs, the hospital offers an on-site fitness center that is open around the clock and a spacious, remodeled café that offers healthy food options for patients, families and hospital staff. Regions' commitment to employee health and well-being extends to the mind as well. The hospital's Center for Employee Resilience is believed to be the largest space in Minnesota dedicated solely to making it easier for hospital employees to relax, restore and renew. Regions employees are pleased with the improvements. In the hospital's 2016 Annual Engagement Survey, 93 percent of employees said they would recommend their company to others as a good place to work and 95 percent said they would recommend Regions to friends and family for care. In addition, 96 percent said they believe strongly in the company's mission and vision. Providing a positive work environment has played a significant role in Regions' success at retaining employees.

MHA Bruce and Denise Rueben Courage Award

Lawrence J. Massa, MS, FACHE - President & CEO

Minnesota Hospital Association, Saint Paul

2017

Lawrence Massa image Lorry Massa became president and CEO of MHA in October 2008, continuing a 25-year career as a prominent hospital and health care leader in the Upper Midwest. Even before becoming president, he was an instrumental leader at MHA serving as chair of the Board of Directors, the Policy and Advocacy Committee and the Political Action Committee. Lorry's leadership on the MHA board was critical in 2000 when MHA founded the Minnesota Alliance for Patient Safety and in 2003 became the first state in the nation to pass the adverse health event reporting law. He also provided leadership through implementing MHA's successful call-to-action framework with innovative tools and road maps that are used in areas such as falls prevention, pressure ulcer management and medication safety. It is estimated that at least half of all U.S. hospitals have received and benefitted from the medication safety tool. Lorry is a leader who is most passionate about quality, safety and service. Over the span of his career, Lorry has successfully led local, state and national initiatives to improve quality and patient safety. MHA, under his leadership, has earned a national reputation and recognition from our peers at other state hospital associations and at the American Hospital Association for our improvements in quality and safety.

MHA Caregiver of the Year Award

Toni Strand, RN

Avera Marshall Regional Medical Center, Marshall

2017

Toni Strand image Registered nurse Toni Strand, house charge nurse at Avera Marshall Regional Medical Center, is this year's Caregiver of the Year. Toni is described by leaders as engaged, eager to help, supportive and a good problem- solver. As a busy Critical Access Hospital, Avera Marshall gives Toni the opportunity to serve in multiple areas. She oversees day-to-day staffing and all associated nursing operations for behavioral health, medical/surgical, OB/post-partum, emergency and ICU. Unusual for a CAH, Avera Marshall offers care in a number of specialties, with high activity in orthopedics and obstetrics. Toni is in charge of code teams and is a superuser for the electronic medical record system. She led Avera Marshall's medication reconciliation improvement project and took significant ownership for improved medication safety. She responds to traumas and delivers special cares to critical infants, such as ventilating, while awaiting transfer.

MHA Community Benefit Award

Bigfork Valley Hospital, Bigfork

2017

Bigfork Valley Hospital image Bigfork Valley Hospital has been honored with the Community Benefit for a small hospital category for its Bigfork Valley ACTIVE magazine. Through its Community Health Needs Assessment, Bigfork Valley found it needed to connect with the community in a meaningful and effective way to address obesity. It chose to make staying active and eating well important enough to community members to overcome constraints like not having enough time or not liking the flavors of healthy foods. Bigfork Valley transformed its four-page hospital district newsletter into a 16-page magazine describing locally available fitness activities and delicious healthy foods. Six times a year, 3,020 households in the approximately 1,000-square-mile hospital district receive Bigfork Valley ACTIVE magazine. For a wider distribution, the hospital also posts the entire magazine on its website. Highlighted topics have ranged from cross country skiing and golf course walking to antioxidants and roasting vegetables to the value of laughter. As a call to action, the magazine includes a calendar of area active events where people can learn, practice or compete in a sport or activity.

MHA Community Benefit Award

Regions Hospital, Saint Paul

2017

Regions Hospital image The Community Benefit Award for a large hospital goes to Regions Hospital for its Lee and Penny Anderson HeroCare for Veterans program. Launched in 2014, HeroCare is the first program of its kind in Minnesota. It allows veterans and military members who may not qualify for state or federal veteran services to get help and resources during inpatient hospitalization or partial hospitalization. HeroCare offers evidence-based treatment to meet the specific needs of veterans. The program includes a specialist who is a military veteran and an expert at navigating military benefits and resources. The specialist assists patients and their families by connecting them with financial, housing and employment assistance. Since it was introduced, HeroCare has exceeded expectations, providing services for more than 1,700 people throughout all units of the hospital, including the Birth Center. Not only does this impact the veteran and his or her family directly, it impacts the community by creating a dialogue to educate citizens, reduce stigma about mental illness and promote awareness.

MHA Good Catch for Patient Safety Award

Sonam Serpolamatsang - Environmental Services Professional

Park Nicollet Methodist Hospital, Saint Louis Park

2017

Good Catch Award image The Good Catch for Patient Safety Award recognizes a hospital professional who speaks up to prevent potential harm to patients. It is because of the actions taken every day by these dedicated professionals that Minnesota hospitals and health systems continue to be leaders in patient safety across the nation. Sonam Serpolamatsang, an environmental services professional at Park Nicollet Methodist Hospital, received this year's Good Catch for Patient Safety Award. Sonam took action to keep a patient safe as he was being transported back from dialysis. She noticed that the patient appeared to be bleeding and immediately approached her department director and requested that the patient be checked. An examination revealed that the patient was indeed bleeding from his arterial access point. Because of this attentive work, the patient's bleeding was addressed.

MHA Innovation of the Year Award, in Patient Care

Fairview Health Services, Minneapolis

2017

Fairview Health Services image In the large hospital category, Fairview Health Services earned this award for its spread of sepsis best practice work flows developed by the University of Minnesota Medical Center in Minneapolis to its five community hospitals located in Burnsville, Edina, Princeton, Wyoming and Hibbing. The goal was to save 90 lives from October 2015 to October 2016. This effort was launched on July 31, 2015, giving the team only two months to implement the work flows in all hospitals. Fairview developed an innovative spread process using the structure of a system Network Team. The team designated clear roles and responsibilities for each member, forming connections of accountability and collaboration for implementation and ongoing improvement. Network Team work sessions were held in a collaborative environment to develop the spread plan. Key to this collaboration was weekly team phone huddles to discuss progress and barriers on the spread implementation plan and to share successes and ideas for continuous improvement that the members brought back to their hospitals to implement. The team was thrilled that the innovative and collaborative approach to spread the implementation of sepsis best practices saved 134 lives by October 2016, which far exceeded the goal.

MHA Innovation of the Year Award, in Patient Care

CHI St. Gabriel's Health, Little Falls

2017

CHI St Gabriels  image In 2015 CHI St. Gabriel's Health received a State Innovation Model grant to focus on a targeted population of patients using narcotics for chronic pain. Emergency room data showed that the number one reason for emergency department visits at St. Gabriel's Hospital was patients seeking narcotics for pain. A multi-disciplinary care team was created to treat each of these patients face-to-face, focusing on the cause of their pain. The Morrison County Prescription Drug Task Force was also formed to enhance community collaboration on this project as significant medication diversion became readily apparent. Together, CHI St. Gabriel's and the task force held a community forum in October 2016 to build awareness, educate and encourage the community to lock medications and properly dispose of unused medications. The team at CHI St. Gabriel's Health has reduced prescribing of opioids in the amount of 9,000 pills each month for the first 127 patients overusing opioids. Hospital pharmacy costs have been reduced by $738,000 annually in pharmaceutical savings for just those 127 patients. Less prescribing offers not only a cost savings, but, more importantly, provides a better quality of life for patients and a safer community now and for the future.

MHA Patient Safety Improvement Award

Avera Marshall Regional Medical Center, Marshall

2017

Avera Marshall image While safety has always been important at Avera Marshall, two years ago leaders and staff began focused efforts to become a safe, highly reliable organization. The hospital implemented a daily safety huddle to establish a standardized approach to identifying and capturing safety issues and near misses. Leaders gather for a quick daily meeting to address safety issues from the previous 24 hours, look ahead for potential issues in the coming 24 hours and follow up on items identified in the previous day's huddle. This practice is improving collaboration, efficiency, accountability, engagement and transparency across the organization. In just two months' time, more than 50 issues have been reported and addressed. The focus is finding and fixing concerns that can contribute to errors to minimize harm and prevent future incidents.

MHA Patient Safety Improvement Award

Children's Minnesota, Minneapolis

2017

Childrens Minnesota image To improve the patient experience, Children's Minnesota began an initiative requiring staff to consistently offer four evidence-based strategies as the standard of care to mitigate needle pain. Care team members partner with parents and caregivers to choose from four Comfort Promise steps to help children have less pain with needle procedures. The steps include numbing the skin, providing sugar water or breastfeeding for infants 12 months or younger, implementing comfort positioning and utilizing age-appropriate distraction. The protocol was established systemwide, including inpatient, ambulatory and outpatient units. All departments were required to offer all four strategies with appropriate education at least 95 percent of the time, and process auditing was undertaken to ensure continuous process improvement. Additionally, outcome measures were tracked for wait times, patient satisfaction, safety learning reports and staff turnover rates, which all demonstrated improvements. Education and improvement efforts were led by an intra-disciplinary team, following Lean methodology. Front-line staff, patients and families were integral to the planning, implementation and change in culture needed to make this initiative a success.

MHA Spirit of Advocacy Award

Paul Goering, M.D. - VP, Mental Health Services

Allina Health, Minneapolis

2017

Paul Goering image Dr. Paul Goering, vice president of mental health and addiction services at Allina Health, has always been an active voice in the mental health community, but he has increasingly taken on a greater level responsibility in recent years. In 2016, he helped lead MHA's work to identify potentially avoidable days that mental health patients spent admitted to the hospital when they would more appropriately have been treated in a different care setting. As a member of the Governor's Task Force on Mental Health, Dr. Goering provided both hospital and ambulatory care experiences that shaped the group's discussions and recommendations. In continuing his commitment to public policy and advocacy, Dr. Goering testified to the Legislature on behalf of the Task Force in early 2017 and then returned later in the session to testify in support of HF 737, MHA-championed legislation to create mental health innovation pilots. Dr. Goering has demonstrated a steadfast commitment to ensuring that patients do not face stigma from their providers or the community.

MHA Stephen Rogness Distinguished Service Award

Rachelle Schultz, EdD - President & CEO

Winona Health, Winona

2017

Rachelle Schultz image Rachelle Schultz, president and CEO at Winona Health, has more than 25 years of experience in health care management. Service excellence, continuous performance improvement and leadership development are key components of her success. As a visionary, she continues to be a leader in the revolutionary transformation of community health care. Rachelle was a member of Minnesota's State Quality Improvement Institute in 2008, serves on the board of the Performance Excellence Network, is the 2017 chair of AHA's Governing Council for Small and Rural Hospitals, is a member of the Rural Health Issues Group and is the board chair for the Minnesota Rural Accountable Care Organization, formed in 2016. She currently serves on the 2017 MHA Annual Meeting Task Force and is a board member of MHA and a former board member of the Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement.

MHA Trustee of the Year Award

Jim McDonough - Trustee Chair, Regions Hospital

Ramsey County Commissioner's Office, Saint Paul

2017

Jim McDonough image Jim McDonough is passionate and dedicated to both the care delivered at Regions Hospital and making sure Ramsey County makes the most of all that Regions has to offer. Jim is in his second stint on the Regions Hospital Board, currently serving as chairman. As a member of the Ramsey County Board, he is a key player in the unique relationship between Ramsey County and Regions Hospital. During Jim's first term on the Regions board, he was instrumental in making Regions $179 million, 11-story expansion become a reality in 2009. The expansion marked the beginning of a renewed commitment by Regions that included a new mental health facility a few years later. Mental health is one of the areas in which Jim's dedication has made a huge difference for the community. He has been a member of the East Metro roundtable, which works to remove barriers to care and develop solutions that help people reach their mental health recovery goals. Among his contributions have been to make sure other Ramsey County leaders are also engaged and working toward those solutions. Through his commitment and dedication, Jim McDonough has been a voice for the underserved in the East Metro by facilitating partnerships and advocating for connections between Regions Hospital, Ramsey County and the community they serve.

MHA Volunteer of the Year Award

Marcie Lindgren

Bigfork Valley Hospital, Bigfork

2017

Marcie Lindgren image A member of the hospital auxiliary for 35 years, Marcie has been treasurer and chaplain, and is now president of the organization. Marcie finds volunteers for the front desk, helps serve at hospital events, coordinates staff appreciation events and works on projects to help fund scholarships for local students in a health care field. After retiring from her career at Bigfork School, she jumped at the chance to staff the information desk at the hospital so she could be the first to welcome visitors. She truly became the face of Bigfork Valley. The little extras are what distinguish Marcie in her volunteer work in the Bigfork community. She looks for ways to help, whether it's soup for the neighbor or cookies on the counter. And she's always there, whether it's a middle of the night call from hospice or an entertainer at the performing arts center who needs a ride.