Minnesota Hospital Association

Quality & Patient Safety

sepsis and septic shock: early identification saves lives

Sepsis and septic shock can be associated with a mortality rate of up to 50 percent in hospitals that do not utilize an early detection and treatment bundle. MHA has coordinated the development of the Seeing Sepsis toolkit to facilitate the adoption of sepsis early detection tools and the Surviving Sepsis Campaign three- and six-hour care bundles by hospitals of all sizes. 

Download the Sepsis road map.

Seeing Sepsis toolkit

Surviving sepsis campaign bundles: 3-hour bundle and 6-hour bundle from: Dellinger RP, Levy MM, Rhodes MB et al: Surviving Sepsis Campaign: International Guidelines for management of severe sepsis and septic shock: 2012. Crit Care Med 2013; 41 (2)  “Reproduced with permission of the publisher. Copyright 2012 Society of Critical Care Medicine and European Society of Intensive Care Medicine.”

Seeing Sepsis Long Term Care resources

Up to 258,000 Americans die each year from sepsis, and it has been proven that many of these deaths could be avoided with early detection strategies and rapid treatment. MHA coordinated the development of a Seeing Sepsis toolkit to facilitate the adoption of severe sepsis early detection tools and the Surviving Sepsis Campaign three- and six-hour care bundles by hospitals. 

Every minute counts in treating sepsis. Because sepsis often begins outside of the hospital, MHA has applied Seeing Sepsis to other settings of care and has coordinated the development of resources, such as treatment algorithms and staff education tools for long term care facilities.